Find out where $2.1M in Community Foundation grants going

Thursday, July 15, 2010 at 2:12am
Staff reports

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee has now distributed $2.1 million in flood relief grants since record-setting rain saturated the Mid-state in early May.

In its fourth round of donations, the group gave $726,000 to nine organizations providing flood relief and restoration services. The funds came from the Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund and Tennessee Emergency Response Fund.

On July 12, The Community Foundation awarded the following flood relief grants from its disaster funds:

• Centerville Church of Christ has received a $20,000 to continue providing aid to residents of Hickman County affected by the flood. Approximately 25-30 victims per week are receiving services including clothing, building supplies, and appliances.

• Hands On Nashville has received two grants, one from each fund, totaling $250,000 to assist in the rebuilding of approximately 75 flood damaged homes with volunteer labor by November 2010. In coordination with Rebuilding Together, Hands On Nashville will work with homeowners through the We Are Home program, and then assess homes, determining the scope of work, requisite supplies and volunteer duties, providing volunteer leaders, general volunteers, and building supplies.

• The Housing Fund has received two grants, one from each fund, totaling $300,000 to provide up to three months of rental assistance to 250 households who do not have sufficient resources to carry the burden of mortgage and rent payments after insurance and FEMA.

• Hull-York Lakeland Resource Conservation and Development has received grants totaling $15,000 from the Tennessee Emergency Response Fund to assist in clean-up of debris and repair work for damaged roads and infrastructure, in coordination with the USDA, for 85 different sites in Clay, Jackson and Macon counties.

• Legal Aid Society has received two grants, one from each fund, totaling $75,000 to provide direct legal assistance and counseling to victims dealing with civil legal issues in the aftermath of the flood through walk-in legal clinics and direct representation to low-income and elderly victims.

• Mission Discovery has received a $36,000 Tennessee Emergency Response Fund grant to provide materials for home repair assistance for approximately 40 families in Davidson and Sumner counties. Home repair assistance will be provided to the elderly and families who do not have flood insurance and have not received FEMA aid.

• North Nashville Flood Relief Group received a $10,000 Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund grant to continue its work to help flood victims in North Nashville.

• Southeast Nashville Flood Relief Team received a $10,000 Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund grant to continue its work to help flood victims in Southeast Nashville.

• West Nashville Flood Recovery Network received a $10,000 Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund grant to continue its work to help flood victims in West Nashville.

In addition to the above organizations, flood relief grants have been distributed from The Community Foundation’s two disaster funds to the following:

Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund grantees

• $10,000 to Catholic Charities of Tennessee to support the cost of staff offering case management services to flood victims, which began on May 5 with the organization moving three existing staff members into the role of offering flood relief support services on a long-term basis.

• $10,000 to Center for Refugees and Immigrants of Tennessee to provide translated materials to various ethnic groups affected by the flood.

• $10,000 to Centerstone of Tennessee to provide training and critical incident services to flood first responders in Middle Tennessee. The organization is working with the mayor’s office to provide training to Metro employees who may handle emotional situations with flood victims, as well as providing post-event individual and/or group services to both traditional and non-traditional responders in Middle Tennessee.

• $10,000 to Community Food Advocates (Manna – Food Security Partners) to connect flood victims to emergency food stamp resources. The organization is using the grant to support its Food Stamp Outreach program, and will continue to provide outreach and advocacy to Nashvillians affected by the floods.

• $10,000 to Community Resource Center to collect and help distribute non-bulk or small quantity donations for victims and volunteers, such as new clothing, hygiene items, masks, tools, and more.

• $10,000 to Conexion Americas to respond to the needs of low-income families in Antioch, many of whom work hourly jobs and did not work for a week or more after the flood, increasing their financial stress.

• $10,000 to Family and Children’s Service to provide material assistance, such as clothing, diapers or help with utilities, to mothers who were directly impacted by the flood and who may have insufficient resources to bridge the gap while waiting on FEMA and other forms of support.

• $10,000 to Hands On Nashville to underwrite the cost of organizing and deploying almost 15,000 volunteers during the first two weeks of the flood.

• $450,000 to The Housing Fund to support flexible grant and loan options for homeowners affected the flood.

• $10,000 to Jewish Family Service of Nashville and Middle Tennessee Inc. to provide direct emergency assistance to both Jewish and non-Jewish victims of the flood including financial stipends, free counseling sessions, coordinating housing arrangements, and donated items.

• $10,000 to Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands to provide legal services to flood victims. In addition to staff members providing advocacy, information and referral to low-income and senior flood victims, volunteer attorneys through the organization’s Nashville Pro Bono Program are participating in legal clinics offering assistance on civic legal questions related to the flood, such as landlord-tenant and lease issues, obtaining unemployment benefits for lost jobs, recovering records and legal documents, and more.

• $10,000 to Martha O’Bryan Center to assist those who needed food and transportation, such as bus passes, immediately following the flood, and provide long-term case management, from helping victims find resources like a clean-up crew to mental health professionals.

• $5,490 to The Mental Health Association to provide resources and recovery strategies for Spanish and English speaking individuals who were victims of the flood.

• $10,000 to MusiCares to distribute funds for music people within 48-72 hours of the disaster, covering the most immediate and basic needs including food and clothing, temporary housing, home repairs, gasoline and transportation, clean up efforts, relocation costs, medicine, and other critical supplies.

• $10,000 to Northwest Family YMCA to support those affected by the flood by helping to provide short-term care needs which may include food, clothing, household items, and transportation assistance.

• $12,500 to Pastoral Counseling Centers to provide counseling to individuals affected by the flood.

• $20,000 to Rooftops to provide rental and mortgage assistance to individuals and families affected by the May 2010 Flood.

• $100,000 to Salvation Army to support its immediate response to the needs of flood victims, which included helping 19,847 families and individuals with meals, personal care items, food boxes, water, clothing, cleaning kits, and spiritual and emotional care, all powered by staff, officers and 4,006 volunteer hours.

• $10,000 to Second Harvest Food Bank to meet an increased demand for food in the wake of the flood, which has included acquiring additional food and supporting the fuel and operating cost of two additional delivery trucks.

• $10,000 to St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church to assist residents affected by the flood with home clean-up and rebuilding.

• $10,000 to St. Luke’s Community House to provide long-term case management including help with food and housing vouchers, access to counseling services, navigating the rebuilding process, and direct assistance in purchasing construction materials.

• $5,516 to Tennessee Foreign Language Institute to provide written translation of various flood materials and on-site interpreter services for those affected by the flood.

• $17,500 to Tennessee Kidney Foundation to provide transportation services to clinics for dialysis patients affected by the flood.

• $10,000 to United Way of Metropolitan Nashville to supports its 2-1-1 service, Tennessee’s free community services help line, which had, as of early June, answered 3,587 calls related to flood assistance.

Tennessee Emergency Response Fund grantees

• $10,000 to Advocates for The Upper Cumberland to provide emergency assistance with rent utilities, deposit fees, and medical supplies to displaced individuals in Smith and Clay counties.

• $10,000 to American Red Cross of Maury County to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $10,000 to American Red Cross of Montgomery County to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $10,000 to Ark Community Resource Center to provide assistance to flood victims who have lost income and wages, clothing, furniture, and housing related items.

• $10,000 to Bethesda Community Center to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $5,000 to Bethesda Community Mission to provide assistance in rent and utility expenses for flood victims, some of whom are collecting unemployment.

• $6,000 to Bethlehem Centers to provide assistance to families suffering flood related losses and financial hardship as a result.

• $1,500 to Blakemore Child Center to provide assistance to families suffering flood related losses and financial hardship as a result.

• $10,000 to Centerville Church of Christ to provide supplies to flood victims such as food, personal hygiene items, cleaning supplies, and tools, and freight to ship donated building supplies.

• $10,000 to Dickson County Help Center to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $8,000 to Eighteenth Avenue Community Center to provide assistance to families suffering flood related losses and financial hardship as a result.

• $2,500 to Fairfield Church of Christ to provide five grants of $500 each to help individuals whose homes were destroyed or damaged.

• $4,000 to Fannie Battle Day Home to provide assistance to families suffering flood related losses and financial hardship as a result.

• $10,400 to Feed America First of Tennessee to provide supplies to families affected by the recent flooding in outlying Middle Tennessee counties.

• $5,000 to Gallatin Cares to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $5,000 to Goodlettsville Help Center to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $10,000 to Graceworks Ministries to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $10,000 to Harpeth River Watershed Association to support clean-up efforts along more than 60 miles of the Harpeth River.

• $10,000 to Helping Hands of Hickman County to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $5,000 to Hendersonville Samaritan Association to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $2,500 Hickman Humane Society to provide foster care, medical and adoption services for dogs and cats displaced due to recent flooding.

• $450,000 to The Housing Fund to support flexible grant and loan options for homeowners affected by the flood.

• $2,500 to Lafayette Church of Christ to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $5,000 to Loaves and Fishes to provide and serve 9,502 meals to help those in need, as well as additional food assistance to almost 1,000 people.

• $2,500 to Macon Helps to help individuals such as senior citizens on a fixed income with no flood insurance by purchasing items such as building supplies, and necessities such as mattresses.

• $13,000 to McNeilly Center for Children to provide assistance to families suffering flood related losses and financial hardship as a result.

• $10,000 to Mid-Cumberland Community Action Agency to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $10,000 to Mission Discovery to provide demolition, mold removal, floor and drywall installation, and debris removal to damaged homes in Sumner County.

• $10,000 to Neighbors Concerned to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $5,000 to Portland Cares to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $5,000 to Refuge Center for Counseling to provide counseling to those suffering emotional distress following the recent floods.

• $10,000 to Smith County Help Center to help families with temporary lodging in the days following the flood, as well as with temporary housing and utility bills.

• $10,000 to Smyrna LaVergne Food Bank to provide food assistance to flood victims like those who have lost jobs due to the flood and those living with friends and relatives who cannot afford food expenses.

• $5,000 to South Central Human Resource Agency to provide first response services, meeting immediate needs of victims in the aftermath of the flood.

• $10,500 to St. Luke’s Community House to provide assistance to families suffering flood related losses and financial hardship as a result.

• $10,000 to St. Mary’s Villa to provide assistance to families suffering flood related losses and financial hardship as a result.

• $10,000 to Wilson County Help Center to provide utility assistance, mortgage assistance and temporary housing to flood victims.


Donations to The Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund and The Tennessee Emergency Response Fund can be made online at www.cfmt.org or by mailing a check to The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, P.O. Box 440225, Nashville, TN, 37244.

To learn more about The Community Foundation’s flood relief efforts, visit www.cfmt.org/flood2010.
 

 

3 Comments on this post:

By: govskeptic on 7/15/10 at 7:41

Looks like a lot of non-profits received a great deal of dollars for
helping pay salaries versus being received by flood victims.

By: budlight on 7/15/10 at 8:05

I'd love to see an audit (in-depth) to see exactly how these funds finally got spent.

By: Loretta Bridge on 7/15/10 at 9:22

Seems like the Community Foundation has done well, but how have these
organizations distributed the funds. Can they provide a detailed list. Does the Community Foundation require them to account for how or do they just trust these
organizations will spend well. The terms "to assist and "to meet" are used frequently.