Meetings reveal lack of consensus on future of fairgrounds

Wednesday, January 20, 2010 at 9:20pm

The takeaway from Wednesday’s pair of fairgrounds meetings: Public opinion is all over the board.

At various times during Councilwoman Sandra Moore’s meeting, the fairgrounds was described as everything from “an eyesore” to “the people’s convention center.” Auto racing, long a staple at the 113-acre facility in south Nashville, is either a tradition or a noise-polluting anachronism, depending on whom you ask.

Down the hill, at a meeting of the Fairgrounds Heritage Preservation Group, opinion was far more consistent — not only should the fairgrounds be preserved as a state fairgrounds, Metro has no other choice, because a century-old law and the Metro Charter bind the fair board to host a fair and bind the fair to that specific tract.

“What it doesn’t do is give them the authority to stop the fair. … They have a legal requirement to have a state fair and have it here,” the group’s Thomas Watson said.

But, it seems, the fairgrounds will shut down at the end of 2010 — the Board of Fair Commissioners, following Mayor Karl Dean’s recommendation, made that decision last fall.

The plan is to redevelop the space, but Moore, whose District 17 includes the fairgrounds, said nothing is final.

“It’s not a done deal,” she said. “In the next couple of weeks, the mayor will put together a task force.”

Moore will chair that group, which she said will have at least four meetings before May. “I’m interested in making it the best it can be,” she said.

Nancy McCune moved to Nashville two years ago. She said something has to change at the fairgrounds.

“When I first drove by this, I thought it was a shuttered industrial complex about to shut down,” she said. “This property is an eyesore and you’ve grown accustomed to an eyesore.”

Councilman Eric Crafton — who attended Moore’s meeting and the preservationist meeting — said he did not see the logic in closing the property.

“It’s not costing the taxpayer any money. … I don’t want this to be turned over to the government so it can be sold,” he said.

Down the hill, at the Knowles Senior Center, Chad Chaffin — a member of the Fairgrounds Speedway Hall of Fame — said despite Moore’s assertion the redevelopment was not a done deal, and despite Crafton’s objections, he knows the council will go along with whatever Dean suggests.

“Of course they won’t [overrule the mayor]. Most of the council members are on board for more and more money for spending however the mayor wants,” he said. “All of our mayors come in from wherever they come from and spend our money on their monuments, but this place is for the people.”

With the funding for the $585 million Music City Center approved, the redevelopment of the fairgrounds is gearing up to be Dean’s next project and one the council is preparing for. Councilman Rip Ryman, chair of the committee that oversees the fairgrounds, has called a special meeting of the committee for 5 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 8, in the council chambers with fairgrounds director Buck Dozier and fair board chairman James Weaver. There will be a public comment period.

80 Comments on this post:

By: govskeptic on 1/21/10 at 6:30

My neighbor attened Ms. Moore's meeting last night and indicated
that there was no doubt that she held this meeting as a first step
for the Mayor. The fact this property is not perfectly flat for the
handicapped is no reason for Metro to be in the rush to sell
this property. It's a great place to host events of interest to many
citizens at a reasonable cost both to the sponsoring event holder
and to the public which attends. Make it better for this type
activity,

By: nashwatcher on 1/21/10 at 8:15

Why not let vanderbilt expand on the property, it will help the area develop...the city could structure a long term lease and use the proceeds for future development of recreational spaces, such as along the riverfront...

By: BigPapa on 1/21/10 at 8:28

I'd argue that is it exactly NOT a good place to host events. It's old, it's ugly, it's run down, it's hilly and it's all concrete blocks and asphalt. Take the 10 mins it will take to level it and sell it off to the highest bidder.

By: njmccune on 1/21/10 at 8:59

As I stated at the meeting last night, the community has become blind to what this place really looks like. It is an eyesore. This mess does not serve this progressive city.

I do not want to end all the stuff that goes on there but I believe that 117 acres is simply not necessary.

As to this property not costing Metro anything... the costs are hidden in the fact that this private business pays no taxes... that means that you and I subsidize all those people who have a business at the flea market, the gun shows and everything else that goes on there.

As to the race enthusiasts, what have they done for this neighborhood? 95% of the participants live in surrounding counties. They come to the track but do not live far enough away to use hotels or even restaurants. One participant at the meeting last night suggest that we wait two years for the Lebanon Race track to go belly up and then we will get back the racing contract that left Nashville and went there! HUH???

One perceptive speaker suggested that there are lots of uses much more suitable to an urban setting. She is forward thinking and right on target.

As to the other meeting... chaired by a self-aggrandizing about to be political candidate... think again before you drink that cool-aid!

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 9:03

the property is run down and outdated. it's going to cost money to bring it up to par. i wonder how old the eletrical, etc. is in those buildings? they're probably a fire hazard. to just leave it as is so that the 95% of race participants can enjoy their track is ridiculous.

By: everloyal on 1/21/10 at 9:08

It would appear that the Mayor is bound and determined to close/sell the Fairgrounds no matter what the public wants. Perhaps he should pause and reflect on what just took place in Massachusetts. Martha Coakley didn't listen and she paid the price for not doing so. Mayor Dean seems to be walking down this same path and hopefully, with the same outcome.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 9:29

everloyal, you mean what SOME of the public wants.

By: BigPapa on 1/21/10 at 9:30

To compare the Mass Senate race to this little squabble is soooooo far off point. If the people racing cars at the track dont even live in Nashville why should we listen to them at all??

By: njmccune on 1/21/10 at 9:46

The member of the Nashville Speedway Hall of fame who spoke at the meeting hosted by CM Moore actually admitted that 95% of the people racing at the fairgrounds do not live in Davidson County.

His argument was that it has always been there so it should always remain!

No city in this country would allow this valuable piece of property to earn no taxes, serve a narrow selection of users that don't even live in the city, and subsidize private businesses( ie: the flea market) to the detriment of taxpayers.

By: TNReader on 1/21/10 at 9:58

I don't live in Metro so I have an independent view. This whole thing reeks of politics and not good sense. The fairgrounds and track have been there longer than any of the surrounding residents. This also appears to be a case of selfish individuals who moved to the area and want changes (See Ms. McCune comments).

From a noise standpoint the track has been there a long time and folks knew of the noise issue when they arrived......if they did not like the noise they should never have moved to the area. From a looks standpoint, the Fair Board should give a track operator a lease term of sufficient length to warrant the spending of money to spruce up the facility. Other users should be charged sufficient rates to warrant spending money for improvements.

By: stlgtr55@yahoo.com on 1/21/10 at 10:00

If they sell the property, will they give the monies to the taxpayers?

By: TNReader on 1/21/10 at 10:09

Additionally, the negative comments about 95% of the race car drivers not living in Nashville so they should be ignored does not hold water. How many people living in Nashville will use the new convention center? How many Titan ticket buyers are people that do not live in Nashville?

Based on the comments about the city not collecting property taxes on the fairgrounds and non residents using the facility, what about the new convention center? The city is taking property OFF the property tax rolls and building a facility for use predominately by non residents.

The people that currently use the fairgrounds spend money when they are in Nashville just like other non residents spend money when they are in town.

By: everloyal on 1/21/10 at 10:17

Blanketnazi2, you are quite right (what SOME of the public wants). Lets assume that those who wish to preserve the Fairgrounds are in the minority. Let's also assume that those opposed to the new convention center are also in the minority. Here's where it gets interesting. If the Mayor keeps alienating various "minority" groups, pretty soon they will form the majority in opposition to another term for this Mayor. That is the hope!

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 10:26

By: stlgtr55@yahoo.com on 1/21/10 at 10:00
If they sell the property, will they give the monies to the taxpayers?

improving the property will bring in more tax revenue, so yes, in a round about way.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 10:46

Dean is doing what is in the best interest of the residents, not the 95% who come in to watch races.

By: concernedtaxpayer on 1/21/10 at 11:02

The fairgrounds may be an eyesore. However, the location is where many individuals get together for the flea market and other events that are actually conservative and wise with their money. Flea market participants still pay sales taxes on products sold (or at least they are supposed to). Dean and his cronies want to shut the Fairgrounds down due to someone else padding his pocket to do something else on the site. Many Davidson county taxpayers do attend events at the Fairgrounds. Metro taxpayers do not pay one dime for flea markets and other events to be held at the fairgrounds (Except the fair - FYI - the money has come out of reserves for the loss on the past few fairs). I have not heard anything about any money that the city will receive for the current convention to become the Medical Mart (someone want to explain?). I would say instead of giving subsidies to the sommet center (over $7 million a year) for the Predators to stay, why not just add extra fees on for those attending to pay (Personally, I know more individuals from other counties --actually Wilson, Rutherford, Sumner, and Williamson Counties --- that attend the games than Davidson County taxpayers). Similar to Titan's games, add another $5 fee/ticket so no subsidy will have to be given yearly from taxpayer's money. To finish up Dean and his cronies need to watch out. The decisions they are making now will come back because most citizens with even just a little common sense want a smaller government because everyone knows private can always do everything better than public (excluding transportation administration and security enforcement).

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 11:05

if you're a concerned tax payer, don't you like the idea of more tax revenue being generated when the fairgrounds gets a "make over" into something better?

By: lisaleeds2008 on 1/21/10 at 11:06

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iK44T22yWI

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 11:06

this can be the key to revitalization of an area of town that really needs it.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 11:08

the people who care about the track don't care about that area of town. heck, they don't live anywhere near there. much more revenue could be generated than a once a month flea market and a once a year fair that keeps losing money. why hold back the neighborhood?

By: bfra on 1/21/10 at 11:38

Dean has evidently got the spineless council members (the ones that voted for the MCC) in his hip pocket, so taxpayers are not considered anymore.

As to the ones that live in the area of the fairgrounds, you knew what was there before you chose the area. Live with it! There are people living in areas that have objections about a nuisance that has moved into their areas after them, which is understandable. But when you move in on top of something and then want to complain, just dumb.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 11:43

so, let's not revitalize that area of town. now that's just dumb.

By: concernedtaxpayer on 1/21/10 at 12:37

I am not against something else being built in that area. Preferably I would prefer the land being sold and the money being combined with money from the sale of the old convention center to build a new fairgrounds at a flat area such as the current Two Rivers golf course property. Instead of Bredeson's $19 million bunker, he should have used that money and the sale of the current fairgrounds to build a new fairgrounds complex. The reason I am against closing the current fairgrounds is due to Dean and his administration and many of the councilmen wiping Dean's ass agreeing with every decision he makes. If Dean wants something else built on the property he will not have a new fairgrounds built. I personally am ready to see what will happen with CMA Music Fest. With the water main breaks and the current convention center being given to the Medical Mart, how will the event occur? Slight possibility the Music Fest may have to be moved back to the fairgrounds this year and bus everyone to the stadium for the night concerts.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 12:41

concerned, i agree about the bunker - what a waste. i'm sure the water main breaks will be fixed by the the the CMA Music Fest comes around, but it has outgrown the fairgrounds. hasn't it been held at LP due to traffic and crowd considerations?

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 12:41

too bad Starwood shut down.

By: Shuzilla on 1/21/10 at 1:02

"No city in this country would allow this valuable piece of property to earn no taxes, serve a narrow selection of users that don't even live in the city, and subsidize private businesses( ie: the flea market) to the detriment of taxpayers."

But why the inconsitency from the mayor between the fairgrounds and the convention center? Your above description could as easily been about the proposed convention center. It's the creation of a venue that DRAWS people from outside of Davidson to spend money IN DAVIDSON is an aspect we already have with the fairgrounds, so why is the mayor not building a new fairgrounds like he's guiding the new convention center to acommodate and expand that draw? He inherited the CC but he owns the fairground decision.

If the racetrack was closed and the remainder of the fairgrounds rebuilt to a venue we'd be proud of, would support for closing it be as high? It just seems that people living in the area feel they're too good to be around fair and flea market-type people.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 1:08

By: Shuzilla on 1/21/10 at 1:02 sez....
It just seems that people living in the area feel they're too good to be around fair and flea market-type people.

no, it's about revitilization of a neighborhood which would help the neighborhood become cleaner and safer.

By: racer84 on 1/21/10 at 1:21

I'll say it like I said yesterday......If you think whats coming is going to be cleaner or safer you are just an obvious fool.

I used to think there was actually a large group who opposed the track, It's obvious from this story alone that there are just the same 3-4 knucklehead jones who think they know what they are talking about and spew forth the same invalid arguments that the facts and figures prove invalid with each story.

Bottom line, current economic impact of $60 million yearly for the city and costs taxpayers 0.
Add in the other 5-10 million annually which is spent and earned in the racing community as a direct result of the racetrack and it's a big deal. Those are jobs which will be lost, as well as untold thousands of other jobs related to the other events which will be lost.

No honest person with any sense can say closing it down is the right thing to do for the majority. You're either lying, crooked and being paid off, or an absolute fool who believes you know what's best when you actually dont.

TN4th Said: If they own their homes, there would be no negative impact. The POSITIVE impact would be that their property values would be higher, so their net worth would rise. Also, the neighborhood would be safer, and there would be more conveniences and services in the neighborhood.

I say : You're a clown, and not a very intelligent one at that.

The rise in property taxes for those on fixed incomes will drive them broke. I've never seen an elderly couple pay for groceries "based on net worth" . It generally takes liquid assets.....or to dumb down to you....cash money.

Add in the rise in every other metro rate for homeowners to pay for what the city can't afford and you're killing them and their families.

Duh

I won't even get into the negative effects of the next 3 years of construction, You know the couple hundred dump trucks hauling millions of tons of dirt and debris each and every morning and night, spreading who knows what kinds of chemicals and dirt that will shut down every ac unit in 5 miles radius plugged with dirt and debris.......Ask people who live close to construction what the negative effects are.
Now maginify that times 117 acres......

What's traffic going to be like with 5,000 to 15,000 HCA employees coming and going at all times of the day ?

They won't use back roads and side streets to avoid traffic will they ?

You won't be able to back out of your own driveway M-F mornings.

Bring in all that traffic, and rich traffic at that and the homeless and criminal element will move in even closer to take advantage of. Ask how many cars are broken into a day at its current location, How many assaults on employees in parking lots ?

Ya'll just aren't thinking past your own nose, You deserve whatever you get.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 1:29

racer could use some anger management.

By: racer84 on 1/21/10 at 1:43

Yes, Try to take away my source of income, and the thing I love to do more than anything in the world.....and yes I get angry....as do several thousand others as part of my racing family.

I'm just mad, You're still an idiot.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 1:49

racer, you'd have more credibility if you'd maintain a civil manner.

By: racer84 on 1/21/10 at 2:12

Anger does not change the facts regardless of the manner in which presented.

They were presented via channel 4, and they mayor's office refuses to acknowlege.

Does anyone else know that more than one group has met with the mayor to purchase the property outright and have been denied a price ?

Is it for sale or not ?

I think it's crooked.....

I should know, Karl Dean's campaign appeared as a sponsor on MY race car, after I was promised by Karl Dean himself and his campaign he was the candidate that would fight to SAVE the fairgrounds AND the RACETRACK. I have pictures to prove, as well as an email from his campaign staff.

Is there any way to look at that any other way than a lie whith his actions since taking office ?

Again, factual information is what is relevant, not the messenger or the way it's presented. There's another fact for you.............

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 2:23

OK, here's a fact for you. it's a done deal. no more racetrack. stop your whining.

doesn't change the fact regardless the manner in which presented. shut your pie hole.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 2:27

basically, you got punked. and you call me an idiot? that's rich.

By: some1else on 1/21/10 at 2:39

@njmccune said "As to this property not costing Metro anything... the costs are hidden in the fact that this private business pays no taxes... that means that you and I subsidize all those people who have a business at the flea market, the gun shows and everything else that goes on there."

Not true. For starters, you have to pay *into* something to subsidize it (you know, like Metro pays the Preds $7 mil a year?) -- Metro does not pay a penny into the fairgrounds-- in fact, the fairgrounds (over)pays metro for many services such as "fleet maintenance" -- about $.5mil a year. All of those people who *do* have businesses that use the fairgrounds *pay* for that priviledge-- no one is given free rent over there (except the mayor's bicycle club!). And all of these businesses pay metro tax on their sales.

@njmccune said "No city in this country would allow this valuable piece of property to earn no taxes, serve a narrow selection of users that don't even live in the city, and subsidize private businesses( ie: the flea market) to the detriment of taxpayers."

wait a minute, this is the fairgrounds, not LP field, which was built with public money, pays no taxes, sits on a huge footprint of land, exclusively houses a sports club owned by a private individual (Bud Adams), and most of the fans don't live in Davidson County. Oh... and Metro also pays them several million a year to cover shortfalls of the operation.

Now let's see... we also have Centennial Park and several golf courses in town that earn no taxes and are supported by Metro (taxpayers). Should we sell them as well??

You cannot compare civic property of any sort to vacant commercial real estate. Civic property of all sorts, whether it's the courthouse, a golf course, a park, or the fairgrounds, all could obviously make more money as commercial developments. But these belong to the *people* and contribute to the quality of life. They, by design, generally *cost* the community to maintain-- which is one outstanding difference in the fairgrounds-- its serves all of these functions and costs the taxpayers nothing-- it's totally self-sustaining.

Remember, the fairgrounds brings in about $60 million a year to Davidson County-- more than the Music City Bowl and Music City Marathon combined-- accounts for over a million visitors each year, over 30,000 'motel nights' ...

@Blanketnazi said -- "no, it's about revitilization of a neighborhood which would help the neighborhood become cleaner and safer."

oh... so you'd be in favor of revitalizing the fairgrounds???

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 2:43

some1else, it's "cost" is low and it's "self-sustaining" because very little money goes into it and it's a dangerous eyesore. more people enjoy Centennial Park and other metro parks properties much more than the fairgrounds. where is the money going to come from to get it up to par? tax money? doubtful. let the private sector improve it.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 3:00

i wonder how much Centennial Park brings in with all its venues.....how many visitors and vendors come for the events there.....

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 3:04

btw, other parks such as Centennial offer free venues for those of low income.....there's more available for free in Nashville than just a flea market.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 3:19

some1else, as far as "contrituting to quality of life" it seems to contribute much more to people outside of Davidson County than the community in which it resides. it certainly doesn't heighten my quality of life. to the residents of the surrounding neighborhoods, it is a delapidated and dangerous eyesore. how much money would it take to revitalize it and where is the money going to come from?

By: BigPapa on 1/21/10 at 3:36

Just because the race track has always been there is probably the WORST argument for NOT improving that area I think Ive ever heard.

Bottom line: the place is a dump, it needs to be improved and bulldozing it down and selling it off is the best way to do that. Race cars belong out in the county. Maybe this will create a business opproutnity for some one in another county or here in Davidson if THAT many people want racing and flea market.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 3:53

i agree, BigPapa. that is the silliest and most childish argument out there.

By: some1else on 1/21/10 at 4:02

@Blanketnazi said - "more people enjoy Centennial Park and other metro parks properties much more than the fairgrounds."

kinda hard to compare, since parks dept. seems to have little hard facts on attendance, but i seriously doubt that any single city park can match the fairgrounds attendance of over a million persons a year...

@Blanketnazi said - " where is the money going to come from to get it up to par? tax money? doubtful. let the private sector improve it."

well.. considering the millions metro pours into parks and subsidizing the shortfalls of the preds and titians, i don't think it would be out of the question for them to jumpstart the fairgrounds after it's sustained itself for over 100 years... however, that's not what i suggest as the first thing to try...

first, i'd give the fairgrounds it's own funds back (like the law requires), and quit giving so much to metro-- the $.5 million or so it pays metro each year in inflated charges-- for such things as "fleet maintenance" that went up about 400% when metro took over their vehicle maintenance.

This would also prevent such things as the $6 million transferred from the fairgrounds to metro to pay for the titians coming here -- part of that extortion was taken from the water department, but part also came from the fairgrounds reserve fund.

All of those buildings and fixtures at the fairgrounds were paid for by profits from prior fairs-- and that would still work...

And yes, i think the private sector could (and would) contribute as well -- look at Shelby Farms in Memphis... they turned an old prison farm over to a citizens committee who solicited private support, and without taxpayer funding, have created the largest urban park in the US, complete with entertainment venues, stables, hiking trails, etc..... but ALL with private funding...

So why couldn't we have say, the "RCA" building at the fairgrounds? or the "Sony" building?... the "Gibson" grandstands? the "Purity Dairy Barn'??? the "Dell" exhibition hall? "Underground Wiring by Electricians' Union Local 666"?? "Landscaping by Lawn Wizard Landscaping Service"??

As a last resort, the Fair Board has the authority to mortgage the property to raise funds for the fair. That's an option that's open, and again, would cost metro nothing.

But what we need most of all is a Fair Board of Commissioners without political influence who will live up to their obligation to preserve and maintain the fairgrounds. We don't need a fair board such as we have now, headed by a real-estate development lobbiest, and made up of political friends of the mayor.

The have $2.6 million left in the reserve fund... easily enough to carry forward for years!

By: bfra on 1/21/10 at 4:05

some1else- People that live in that area are, FOR people that chose to live in that area regardless. THEY chose to live there! Get over it!

They probably never considered, the Fair is far more than the midway. Their attitude is "I" moved here,"I" don't like it, so "THEY" need to leave!

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 4:18

ah, yet another childish rant.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 4:22

some1else, have you attended a lot of the events at Centennial? i'm sure they have more traffic and revenue because of the number of events each year and the cost to the vendors for the events. as for the buildings and fixtures, they obviously need to be replaced. they're outdated and i don't see how they could be up to codes. $2.6 million spends easily on a property that outdated and that large. and i don't realistically see private business wanting a "Sony" building or a "Gibsons" grandstands. i'll admit, that's an awesome idea but i don't see it happening.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 4:24

it's hard to compare Shelby Farms to the fairgrounds. the fairgrounds is now in a urban setting which changes the dynamics.

By: some1else on 1/21/10 at 4:26

@blanketnazi -- "some1else, as far as "contrituting to quality of life" it seems to contribute much more to people outside of Davidson County than the community in which it resides. it certainly doesn't heighten my quality of life. to the residents of the surrounding neighborhoods, it is a delapidated and dangerous eyesore. how much money would it take to revitalize it and where is the money going to come from?"

you should have been at the meeting at the senior center last night - of the 80 or so people in attendance, about 40-50 of them were neighbors of yours who supported preserving the fairgrounds. of course we were all in agreement that it needs revitalizing.

and we estimate about $2 in cash would fix it up for now -- less with some private sponsorship.

@Bigpappa - "Maybe this will create a business opproutnity for some one in another county"

why in the world send the jobs, $60 million in economic impact, and entertainment for residents to another county???

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 4:29

because you could have a larger economic impact than $60 million if it were private.

By: Blanketnazi2 on 1/21/10 at 4:30

fix it up for now sounds half assed. less with private sponsorship is assuming you'll get it.

By: 117_acres on 1/21/10 at 4:33

Let's call this group the Racetrack Heritage Preservation Group because that is what they really are. They don't care about the fairgrounds they only care about the racetrack. If the city would go ahead and tear down the racetrack we would never hear from these simple minded people again. They have another place to race in Greenbrier, TN at the Highland Rim Speedway and a place to watch professional racing at the Nashville Super Speedway in Lebanon, TN. Both tracks are located in a rural area, the land and businesses are privately owned and operated.
I drove by the Racetrack Preservation Groups meeting last night and boy did they pack in the people. "LOL" There might have been twenty (20) people who attended this meeting which was actually not a Racetrack Preservation Group meeting but instead a Ronnie Greer for council campaign rally.
The City loses money every year by not doing something else with this dilapidated property. The last racetrack lessee paid $50,000 in rent to operate the racetrack and he couldn't even pay that and has asked the city to forgive him of the money he owes in back rent. The racetrack takes up 14 acres of land and usually runs from March to December. $50,000 is not anywhere close to what the fair market of 14 acres is considering this property is less than two (2) miles from downtown Nashville. I pay at or around a $1,000 a year in property taxes for less than a quarter acre of land. As a manner of fact my home which is less than a mile away from the fairgrounds and is at or around 940 square feet cost me over $100,000 to purchase. So, basically I have paid more for a home than the racetrack lessee has paid to use the racetrack. That makes a lot of sense for the city to continue renting this facility out for $50,000 a year so that it can continue to disturb the residents of Nashville! If racing continues at the fairgrounds the rent for any lessee should start at a $1,000,000 per year.
You don't need 117 acres of land to do wrestling, Christmas village, flea market,
and etc. All these events are great but it is time to do something else with this property. Let's open this property up for the entire city of Nashville to benefit from. Lastly, for those of us who live in the neighborhood remember you can't rationalize or reason with rednecks!