Joe Scarlett: Let the free market live

Sunday, August 15, 2010 at 11:58pm
By Joe Scarlett

Our free marketplace is not perfect and never will be. But it is the most spectacular wealth-generating machine in the history of the world.

No one likes what has happened to our economy recently, but we should never forget that wealth is created by individuals and businesses — not government. Our systems of economic freedom, innovation and entrepreneurship will continue to generate powerful, long-term growth — as long as we don’t mess it up.

Our nation was founded on principles of freedom that include limited government and maximum personal rights. We cherish our right to freely pursue any legal business opportunity with minimal government restriction.

More government regulation only means a higher cost to do business, which translates to consumers paying higher prices for goods and services. Attempting to regulate ourselves to perfection will only lead to paralysis.

Right now, we can still try any “wild and crazy” idea for a new product or service, as long as we don’t violate the various laws and regulations. Often it is these very wild and crazy ideas that lead to innovation and wealth creation.

Suppose you have an interesting idea about a new product. You borrow a little money, buy some raw materials, assemble your product and then sell it. Most ideas fail, but let’s say yours works. Next you rent a building, lease some equipment and hire an engineer, a few production folks, an accountant and a salesperson. You are creating a product for customers, employing a half-dozen people and generating wealth that you will likely reinvest in your growing start-up business.

As this scenario demonstrates, wealth is created by individuals and businesses, not government. But government can redistribute wealth. The more we borrow to redistribute (to be paid back by future taxes), the more we increase taxes and impose additional regulations, which in turn discourage our entrepreneurial spirit. The more the government takes and regulates, the less incentive individuals have to innovate and produce.

The unintended consequences of government oversight and regulation are often beyond comprehension. After the Enron scandals, Congress passed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which was supposed to prevent all sorts of monkey business. Yet after just a few years, we had the Bernie Madoff scandal and the big-banking meltdown. And on top of that, American business is now forced to spend billions annually in compliance costs, and that has made our country just a little bit less competitive in the global market. Government oversight inevitably slows and sometimes paralyzes the very businesses it is intending to help.

Our capitalist system makes big mistakes but also creates incredible wealth. The continual process of business failures and bankruptcies are key ingredients in the process because from the ruins capital is redeployed where it can be more productive. In addition, failures are learning tools that help inspire new ideas and new businesses.

The current march toward greater government regulation is also a march toward business mediocrity. The more complex the oversight, the slower our great wealth-generating machine operates. People come from everywhere to participate in our economy because they see greater opportunity here than in their own countries. Free people and free markets generate the ideas that have made our economy the envy of the world. Our politicians should be encouraging those free markets and minimizing business regulations and controls.

Our collective objective should be to support and encourage ethical and transparent business and industry. We do have the best economic system in the world, and no matter what has happened recently, we should never forget how we achieved such success in the first place.

Joe Scarlett is the retired chairman of Tractor Supply Co. and founder of the Scarlett Leadership Institute at Belmont University

143 Comments on this post:

By: govskeptic on 8/16/10 at 6:59

While we may be headed toward over regulation now, it must be admitted that we have been through many yrs of under or ignored regulations. The Savings and Loan crisis, the Tech bubble, the recent Financial bust are all examples of our institutions and congressional oversight as being total failures. The innovation of how to fleece the populace and taxpayers will hopefully not be the
major thrust of our new economic recovery.

By: Captain Nemo on 8/16/10 at 7:32

Good morning

Sunrise Over Oconaluftee Valley Overlook

http://www.jeremybrasher.com/images/large/O-overlook MASTER.jpg

By: Captain Nemo on 8/16/10 at 7:33

I agree with you govskeptic. The Fox has been rampant in the henhouse far to long while the government sat back and seemingly encouraged it to happen. Maybe over regulating will accrue, but I am confident that it too will be relaxed at some point in the future.

By: producer2 on 8/16/10 at 7:34

one man's government oversight is another man's de-regulation.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 7:49

Good morning, Nashville!

The NCP identified the writer of this anti-government tirade as the "retired chairman of Tractor Supply Co. and founder of the Scarlett Leadership Institute at Belmont University". I appreciate it when the editors identify professional zealots like this, as opposed to publishing a missive without dicsclosing pertinent facts that help to explain the author's personal perspective and bias.

Belmont claims to be a "Christian University", apparently Jesus of Nazareth shared Scarlett's utter disdain for government and governmental regulations. Who knew?

Christ was a Tea-bagger?

I think that the (BP) Deep Horizon debacle has shown that blind faith in the fundamental goodness of profit-making corporations is a very foolish notion. Mr. Scarlett is either terminally naive, stupid, delusional or simply dishonest.

By: budlight on 8/16/10 at 8:17

Mr. Scarlett is either terminally naive, stupid, delusional or simply dishonest.

Loner why is it that when someone disagrees with your way of thinking, they are "terminally naive, stupid, delusional or simply dishonest"?

why can't they just be different? Are you saying you have never been naive, stupid, delusional or simply dishonest?

Most of us have been at least one of those for at least once in our lives. That is to say IF we have truly been living.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 8:18

Happy Monday to everyone.

Does Belmont still claim to be a Christian school? They had a big flap a few years ago separating themselves from the Baptist church.

Random quote for today:
"Hand me a pair of leather pants and a CASIO keyboard -- I'm living for today!"

By: rldavenport@com... on 8/16/10 at 8:29

Loner:

It is you who has blind and delusional faith in the "fundamental goodness" of government, especially when our representatives continually engage in wasteful spending, steal from Social Security, etc. to cover their behinds, play childish political games with each other instead of focusing on the real problems in our society, etc. Increased taxes do nothing to spur the economy. They do not "soak" the rich; they "soak" everybody! You cannot deny that legislation sponsored by Barney Frank,Chris Dodd, etc. that forced banks to loan to people who could not repay those loans was one of the largest factors that led to the housing crisis. Wake up to your own blindness.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 8:34

I do not identify all those who disagree with me as being, "either terminally naive, stupid, delusional or simply dishonest". That's an unfair and inaccurate allegation.

Joe Scarlett is, IMO, either terminally naive, stupid, delusional or simply dishonest. I base that opinion on what Joe wrote in his long-winded rant. Just calling it as I see it. I did not sugar-coat my reaction to Scarlett's letter.

I'm sure that Joe has his redeeming qualities. I simply did not see any of them displayed here. No "hate" here, just an honest appraisal of a published missive.

By: yogiman on 8/16/10 at 8:34

Good morning, Ya'll.

I agree with Mr. Scarlett. The government doesn't MAKE money, they don't have to. They simply TAKE money. They call it taxes. Since we 'supposedly' put them in office, they feel they can decide how much of our money they want to take and spend it like they want to. To heck (to use that tem loosley) with what ya'll want.

By: bfra on 8/16/10 at 8:40

Mornin' Nemo - Pretty picture! Wasn't Vegas, but I spent the weekend on the Delta Gueen in Chattanooga. Saw some pretty sunrises & sunsets.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 8:49

Rldavenport, I do not have "blind faith in government", as you suggest.

I have strongly criticized the unholy relationship between campaign donations and policy decisions.

I have accused both major political parties of being on the take - bribed by lobbyists, into willing submission.

I have pointed out and condemned the cozy status quo that has short-circuited our democratic process. Gerrymandered districting, for example, has effectively defeated the Founder's intent.

The Electoral College artifact has produced a system that precludes third party possibilies and substitutes "battleground states", as opposed to a nationwide contest for the Presidency.

I could go on....I hope I've made my point.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 8:56

Amy, I got leather pants and a keyboard...where do I sign up?

Nice photo, Cap'n.

Mornin' Yogiman. The Fed tells the US mint what to print, or so I am told. The Federal Reserve Board calls the shots...am I wrong on that?

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 9:11

President Nixon, a Republican's Republican, decided to let the US dollar's value "float" on the free market seas, without an anchor. That was step one in the Republican's dubious economic master-plan.

The Reagan and Bush tax cuts, combined with GOP-sponsored corporate welfare have since depleted the national treasury.

The Republican's penchant for waging pre-emptive land wars, especially in the Middle East and in Asia, at the behest of the War Lobby, has rapidly drained our reserves of troops and treasure.

Ronald Reagan once claimed that "deficits don't matter". Now we can see that President Reagan was merely a "B" movie actor reading from a script written by Wall Street tycoons. It was grand theater....some took it seriously.

And now the GOP offers Sarah Palin as an option? You gotta be kidding.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 9:19

Surreality:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/SHOWBIZ/celebrity.news.gossip/08/15/tila.tequila.attacked/?hpt=Sbin

"...dudes were throwing huge stone rocks in my face, beer bottles that slit my eye open, almost burnt my hair ... cuz they threw fire crackers on stage"

contrast with:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-10983494

Are we a civilized nation?

D7 said on Friday that I am "shallow" but somehow he can only taunt me and not support a stance that denies some people a right. As if it is OK for us just throw the rule of law out the window on special occasions. It won't matter... yeah, I am the shallow one. Clever.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 9:26

Amy, FYI:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

"On November 14, 2007, Nashville media reported that a settlement of this suit had been reached before trial. Under its terms, the TBC and Belmont would disaffiliate amicably, with Belmont agreeing to pay one million dollars to the convention immediately, and $250,000 annually for the next forty years, for a total cost of $11,000,000. The University has stated its intent to maintain a Christian identity, but no longer a specifically Baptist one."

There you have it "Christian Identity" is new euphemism that attempts to perfume the idea. To me, genuine education should not be faith-based; a healthy skepticism is essential for critical thinking and scientific advancement. Diversity is good, but Belmont did not get the memo; they wallow in superstition, xenophobia and ignorance, IMO.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 9:47

Palin is going no where. We should all relegate her to the back of our memories... I keep her next to Tiny Tim unless you guys keep bringing her up. :(

I would like to hear from any politician that has a degree in economics.
http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2008/10/01/most-lawmakers-dont-have-economic-education/

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 9:50

When they get stoned in Taliban country, they really get stoned, Amy.

One must ask, "what in the hell are we doing over there?" These folks are several hundred years behind the growth curve of human development. Throwing American troops and treasure at the problem is counter-productive; our occupation only empowers the rabid Islamists.

Yes, the energy pipelines must go through, the War Lobby has bet the farm on it....both political parties are enabling this ridiculous fiasco.

Time to dissolve the American union of states? That's the only remaining tool left in the People's toolbox...or so it seems.The national debt would be defaulted on, US entitlements would evaporate, the US war machine and the gaggle of federal level lobbyists would have to find honest work. Parasite nations would be forced to find a new host.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 9:53

Boy - Belmont needs to get their marketing and public relations people to read this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Identity

I know that is not what Belmont means but surely they should edit their entry on Wikipedia.

Loner, how were things in upstate last weekend?

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 9:57

Palin is not going away anytime soon. Her recent press releases show evidence of having a savvy ghost-writer on her payroll. The good-looking woman is digesting the talking points and spitting them back out. She is being groomed by the War Lobby, Amy. Do not dismiss her so easily. She's the best that the GOP has to offer.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 10:00

"Christian Identity" does have a taint on it, Amy. Like I said, Belmont didn't get the memo. I appreciate their honesty, they are a (white, non-Catholic) Christian supremacist outfit....the "Christian Identity" tag is very fitting.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 10:02

Things were good here, Amy. My HS reunion was fun. We had a thunderstorm last night. It's nice outside at this time...I may have to take a ride.

By: brrrrk on 8/16/10 at 10:24

For those of you that think that Germany hasn't got it going on....

Germany’s economic growth boosted by exports

http://www.financemarkets.co.uk/2010/08/13/germany%E2%80%99s-economic-growth-boosted-by-exports/

In fact, some economists are saying that Germany's Achilles heal is now that they export too much...... I would wish that problem on us.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 10:25

Of course, eight people were shot in Buffalo, 4 died...guns in bars affair...the shootings took place in the parking lot. One man was gunned down in Rochester over the weekend...robbed by young punks, then shot to death.

Other than that, Western New York is just fine this Monday morning.

Rochester's Mayor, Bob Duffy, is Andy Cuomo's ( Mario's kid) pick for LT. Governor; Duffy is the former Poice Chief for Rochester...the body count for Roch. is now at 22 for the year, I believe. We are going for a record.

By: BenDover on 8/16/10 at 10:25

Hayek's 'Constitution of Liberty' offers the best defense of Mr. Scarlett's points that I have read. It should be required reading but instead we are indoctrinated with the Keynes evil party dude personality, breaking windows and spending money not unlike drunken sailors; though this comparison to our congress makes the drunken sailors seem far better by comparison.

The problem is that nobody wants to pay attention to the 2nd half of Keynes; where he requires the deficit spending during the down-turn be paid off during the recovery. That part isn't palatable to people in positions of power because money is their power. Since Keynes is flawed in this way; doing deficit spending during the down-turn will lead to inevitable devastation to the economy.

It's no wonder that Keynes is all they teach in undergraduate studies though because rationalization of taking over the private sector by engorging the monster that is government is a script written for the liberal collectivist ideology that permeates higher education and the political class (mostly people who've never worked in the private sector). If it continues unchecked, though, this big tick will end up killing the free enterprise host first and then, history teaches, it will turn and start eating all the people who gave it the power in the first place.

The arrogant central planning model that gives government the massive power to choose winners and losers based on a sense of superior intellect, morality and reason is a faux utopia. Government can never make decisions better than an individual knowing his own situation and freed to work in his own interest. And the failure to out perform the free market typically results in calls for more and more control to make it better. The cure is the cause.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 10:35

Something shallow to ponder, but just for fun...

The Chunnel (3 parallel tunnels 25' diameter) cost 290M pounds per mile. That includes financing.

The UNOCAL pipeline is 1040 miles long.

If it were apples to apples then the US war in Afghanistan alone has cost enough to tunnel the whole distance. Using todays exchange rate.

Is this realistic? No, but at what point does it become reasonable to consider? So I haven't factored in inflation or other aspects like not needing 3 tunnels at 25' each.

Should we at least do some core samples? What could the Afghan people really do about a pipe 300 feet underneath them and not knowing it's actual route.

Chunnel construction deaths were 10 for 30 miles. We loose that many in a slow month, not counting civilian or enemy deaths.

http://www.channeltunnel.co.uk/Faqs.asp
http://costofwar.com/

We now return to your regularly scheduled pipe dream...

By: dnewton on 8/16/10 at 10:44

Economic Bubbles have been seen hundreds of years ago. The bubble phenomenon existed in history both with and without regulation. I think that some other reason besides lack of regulation or over regulation for the persistence of economic bubbles must be formulated. Mass hysteria or mass delusion seems to be a better theory for the cause of economic bubbles. The reason regulation won't fix the bubbles is that regulators are also subject to mass hysteria and mass delusion. Only half of congress needs to be convinced of something that is not true or partially true to instigate a bubble.

The market does not always send correct price or cost signals but when the government is toying with the mechanism with subsidies and fanning fears of possible future disaster or even good times, distortions persist. The government might go into Wal-Mart and switch a bunch of price tags but the result would be chaos. Some customers would get bargains but other products would not sell as often, thus destroying demand and jobs for the unlucky producers that got "new" government forced price tags at the higher price. For you and me, switching price tags is a criminal act. When the government does it, it is called good intentions.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 10:52

DNewton discovers Praxeology :)

http://mises.org/books/messtudy.pdf

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 10:53

Ben used the term, "liberal collectivist ideology"....so, that's where Limbaigh got that expression from....our own Ben Dover is writing the conservative script...he is not simply regurgitating the talking points.

Here is a link to a recent piece written by David Stockman, Reagan's former Budget Director....the guy is a Republican, not a liberal collectivist. Stockman blames the GOP for "destroying the US Economy".

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/01/opinion/01stockman.html

Here's a juicy snippet:

"Republicans used to believe that prosperity depended upon the regular balancing of accounts — in government, in international trade, on the ledgers of central banks and in the financial affairs of private households and businesses, too. But the new catechism, as practiced by Republican policymakers for decades now, has amounted to little more than money printing and deficit finance — vulgar Keynesianism robed in the ideological vestments of the prosperous classes."

I invite you to read the 2-page essay, Ben....Stockman is a lot more articulate than I am, on this particular subject. If you can refute Stockman, why not compose an LTE to that effect.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 11:04

GOP and DNC... it takes two to tango.

Ben's point is, and what I also said a week ago (surf's up), is that for Keynesian theory to work - you have to reign in things during the good times.

Since 35 years have gone by no one, made that effort work. There was a boom during Reagan... he missed it. But also we had a strong economy under Clinton... did the value of the dollar go up or down?

Take into account that the president doesn't really control this but congress does. That only makes it harder to put in action. 535 of them need to agree and only 7% currently have accredited economic education.

Palin is not in that 7%, just ask Wasilla. But we should be so lucky to have her run against Obama in '12. Maybe Ralph Nader will win!

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 11:04

Here's David Stockman's parting shot...

"The day of national reckoning has arrived. We will not have a conventional business recovery now, but rather a long hangover of debt liquidation and downsizing — as suggested by last week’s news that the national economy grew at an anemic annual rate of 2.4 percent in the second quarter. Under these circumstances, it’s a pity that the modern Republican Party offers the American people an irrelevant platform of recycled Keynesianism when the old approach — balanced budgets, sound money and financial discipline — is needed more than ever."

By: Lab on 8/16/10 at 11:05

Joe: I know you do not need me or anyone else to defend you; some of the comments are so undeserved. I remember years ago when you chose our little company to be your wireless dealer. Thank you for choosing small business instead of the big carrier.
I also remember on the various times I visited you, your (executive)office was right next to the other employees, not in some penthouse far removed from the action. Thank you for the open door policy.
I do not recollect ever hearing any accusations that Tractor Supply was a price gouging company. Thank you for serving the middle class.
In the sixth paragraph, I see your eternal optimism. However, for the benefit of a few, I need to add a few items. "you borrow a little money:" thanks to the present uncertainties generated at the federal level, borrowing today is very difficult. "you rent a building:" unfortunately regardless if one's new company is a proprietorship or a corporation, because of the uncertainties, the landlord will require a personal guarantee for the period of the rental argeement, so your entire personal life is always at risk. You "lease some equipment:" the leasing company will be glad to help just as soon as the company can show at least two years of profitable operation. You "hire an engineer...a few production folks...an accountant...a salesman:" in other words, one must be able to cover those costs with absolutely no guarantee there will be sufficient sales to make break-even. You are"generating wealth...you are likely to reinvest in the business:" today we are told that profits are demonic, that some people have already made enough money, that the federal government will pick and choose which entities are "too big to fail," and that if working 16 hours a day for years actually does result in a successful business, then one must "share the wealth" with those who are chosen by the federal government.
Sometimes it is difficult to believe that there are those who actually try to jump all these hurdles, and attempt to create jobs in the process. If one does succeed, it won't be long before government will try to take it all away.
Thanks again for your business, your friendship, and your optimism.

By: Lab on 8/16/10 at 11:05

Joe: I know you do not need me or anyone else to defend you; some of the comments are so undeserved. I remember years ago when you chose our little company to be your wireless dealer. Thank you for choosing small business instead of the big carrier.
I also remember on the various times I visited you, your (executive)office was right next to the other employees, not in some penthouse far removed from the action. Thank you for the open door policy.
I do not recollect ever hearing any accusations that Tractor Supply was a price gouging company. Thank you for serving the middle class.
In the sixth paragraph, I see your eternal optimism. However, for the benefit of a few, I need to add a few items. "you borrow a little money:" thanks to the present uncertainties generated at the federal level, borrowing today is very difficult. "you rent a building:" unfortunately regardless if one's new company is a proprietorship or a corporation, because of the uncertainties, the landlord will require a personal guarantee for the period of the rental argeement, so your entire personal life is always at risk. You "lease some equipment:" the leasing company will be glad to help just as soon as the company can show at least two years of profitable operation. You "hire an engineer...a few production folks...an accountant...a salesman:" in other words, one must be able to cover those costs with absolutely no guarantee there will be sufficient sales to make break-even. You are"generating wealth...you are likely to reinvest in the business:" today we are told that profits are demonic, that some people have already made enough money, that the federal government will pick and choose which entities are "too big to fail," and that if working 16 hours a day for years actually does result in a successful business, then one must "share the wealth" with those who are chosen by the federal government.
Sometimes it is difficult to believe that there are those who actually try to jump all these hurdles, and attempt to create jobs in the process. If one does succeed, it won't be long before government will try to take it all away.
Thanks again for your business, your friendship, and your optimism.

By: Captain Nemo on 8/16/10 at 11:07

Garden of the Troll

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/122/278213738_42d2d108a9.jpg

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 11:16

Be careful of what you wish for, Amy. A GOP-endorsed Palin just might unhorse Mr. Obama. The GOP is going to tie Obama to radical Islam - Obama's "Ground Zero Mosque" remarks will hang around his neck, like a rotting albatross. Unless the developer changes its mind on the location, getting Obama off the hook, this mosque issue will fester.

Obama needs to get this issue off the screens quickly...he was right to defend the right of religious freedom, but errored gravely by appearing to endorse this particular project. Now, he appears to be waffling...he stepped in deep doo-doo and the smelly stuff will track its way back into the White House. Palin will clean those carpets, you betcha!

By: Captain Nemo on 8/16/10 at 11:24

By: rldavenport@com... on 8/16/10 at 8:29
Loner:

It is you who has blind and delusional faith in the "fundamental goodness" of government,
*******************************************************************************************

Dear ridavenport, tel me what you think of this goverment? Did you have blind faith in it?

We know where they are. They're in the area around Tikrit and Baghdad and east, west, south and north somewhat.
Donald Rumsfeld
March 30, 2003

I don't believe anyone that I know in the administration ever said that Iraq had nuclear weapons.
Donald Rumsfeld,
May 14, 2003

By: Captain Nemo on 8/16/10 at 11:25

bfra-
I drove through Chattanooga on my way to and from Atlanta yesterday.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 11:29

Question: Would the "Ground Zero Mosque" be tax exempt? If so, the decision to take such a valuable location off the tax roles should be carefully considered and open to public debate.

The public is forced to make up the revenue foregone when houses of worship are built; therefore the public should be allowed to vote on all such proposals, IMO.

Think about it, every new church, temple, mosque etc. represents revenue foregone, leaving the taxpayers to foot the bill.

Freedom of religion, or freedom from paying taxes?... that is the question.

By: Captain Nemo on 8/16/10 at 11:33

By: yogiman on 8/16/10 at 8:34
Good morning, Ya'll.

I agree with Mr. Scarlett. The government doesn't MAKE money, they don't have to. They simply TAKE money. They call it taxes. Since we 'supposedly' put them in office, they feel they can decide how much of our money they want to take and spend it like they want to. To heck (to use that tem loosley) with what ya'll want.
*******************************************************************************************

Once again simple yogiman makes a funny. He criticizes the government for taking taxes to pay the bills, yet this whinny Security Guard as he called himself took the ill gotten money in Atlanta.

Do you plan to give it back to the Tax payers now?

By: dnewton on 8/16/10 at 11:36

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 11:04

Ben's point is, and what I also said a week ago (surf's up), is that for Keynesian theory to work - you have to reign in things during the good times.

According to some Keynesians, the theory breaks down under two conditions, when savings increase and when there is a zero interest rate. These situations have been reduced to two major paradoxes: The Paradox of Thrift and The Paradox of Toil. We don't have a zero interest rate but if you calculate the real interest rate after inflation, it gets closer to zero. We are also seeing increased savings.

When a theory starts developing paradoxes, it is time to look for another theory.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 11:38

Joe Scarlett has a pet Lab?

That post by Lab was sweet as Chocolate Lab wine, lovingly vinted in the Finger Lakes region of New York state. Served ice cold...mmmmm...chicks dig it.

Like I said, Joe probably has his redeeming qualities; but his missive sucked, IMO.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 11:42

I don't wish for it Loner. I really doubt she can hold it together that long. We'll see. Ugh.

That was a good article Loner, thanks. I like his style and tactic. May have to look for more of his writing.

By: BenDover on 8/16/10 at 11:46

Loner, I smell what you're steppin' in. The SCotUS Kelo decison, though I disagree with it, would support intervention by government on the ground that the public is better served by having a tax generating business there rather than a mosque.

By: Captain Nemo on 8/16/10 at 11:47

Here is the list of Muslims that were murder in the Twin Towers on 8/11

Samad Afridi
Ashraf Ahmad
Shabbir Ahmad (45 years old; Windows on the World; leaves wife and 3 children)
Umar Ahmad
Azam Ahsan
Ahmed Ali
Tariq Amanullah (40 years old; Fiduciary Trust Co.; ICNA website team member; leaves wife and 2 children)
Touri Bolourchi (69 years old; United Airlines #175; a retired nurse from Tehran)
Salauddin Ahmad Chaudhury
Abdul K. Chowdhury (30 years old; Cantor Fitzgerald)
Mohammad S. Chowdhury (39 years old; Windows on the World; leaves wife and child born 2 days after the attack)
Jamal Legesse Desantis
Ramzi Attallah Douani (35 years old; Marsh & McLennan)
SaleemUllah Farooqi
Syed Fatha (54 years old; Pitney Bowes)
Osman Gani
Mohammad Hamdani (50 years old)
Salman Hamdani (NYPD Cadet)
Aisha Harris (21 years old; General Telecom)
Shakila Hoque (Marsh & McLennan)
Nabid Hossain
Shahzad Hussain
Talat Hussain
Mohammad Shah Jahan (Marsh & McLennan)
Yasmeen Jamal
Mohammed Jawarta (MAS security)
Arslan Khan Khakwani
Asim Khan
Ataullah Khan
Ayub Khan
Qasim Ali Khan
Sarah Khan (32 years old; Cantor Fitzgerald)
Taimour Khan (29 years old; Karr Futures)
Yasmeen Khan
Zahida Khan
Badruddin Lakhani
Omar Malick
Nurul Hoque Miah (36 years old)
Mubarak Mohammad (23 years old)
Boyie Mohammed (Carr Futures)
Raza Mujtaba
Omar Namoos
Mujeb Qazi
Tarranum Rahim
Ehtesham U. Raja (28 years old)
Ameenia Rasool (33 years old)
Naveed Rehman
Yusuf Saad
Rahma Salie & unborn child (28 years old; American Airlines #11; wife of Michael Theodoridis; 7 months pregnant)
Shoman Samad
Asad Samir
Khalid Shahid (25 years old; Cantor Fitzgerald; engaged to be married in November)
Mohammed Shajahan (44 years old; Marsh & McLennan)
Naseema Simjee (Franklin Resources Inc.'s Fiduciary Trust)
Jamil Swaati
Sanober Syed
Robert Elias Talhami (40 years old; Cantor Fitzgerald)
Michael Theodoridis (32 years old; American Airlines #11; husband of Rahma Salie)
W. Wahid

By: BenDover on 8/16/10 at 11:52

On your link, I think Stockman's exhibiting a little myopia there in an obvious b*tch slap to the Republicans. One would guess it’s intended as a shot to them in the hypocrisy arm. But there's little doubt there is enough blame for spending excesses to go around for both parties.

Like I've always said... compromise in Washington is them agreeing about how to spend more of our money. There are many arrogant egghead collectivists who dismiss Joe Lunchbox’s ability to feed himself in both parties though. It's a flawed model whether it's the genius Obama, or the genius Woodrow, or the genius FDR, or the genius Nixon applying it. It's like when they hit the Ivy League they slather a thick protective layer between the higher brain and common sense and then start filling them up with crap.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 11:57

Stockman seems to know what he's talking about..much of it is above my pay grade....I believe Stockman....it's all faith-based, I suppose....I have faith in Stockman's expert analysis.

Since the POTUS job is primariloy that of figurehead leader, as evidenced by Reagan's and Junior Bush's time in office, Sarah Palin could pull off the role..she's as smart as Bush...that's good enough...too smart and the corrupted GOP loses control.

Obama runs the risk of being too smart. The Democrats do not like the idea of defending a mosque at Ground Zero. Obama is losing his base and he never converted any Republicans, to my knowledge.

Like Jimmy Carter and Woodrow Wilson, Barack Obama may be too far ahead of the parade.

By: AmyLiorate on 8/16/10 at 12:02

Yes Newton... savings are not good under the Keynesian plan.

Loner if BHO could just stop himself from having to put his mark on every headline USA Today publishes then he'd go a lot further. He just can't resists the urge to call someone out for "acting stupidly" or building a mosque.

He's kinda like Barney Fife, keeps taking that bullet out of his pocket and shooting his self in the foot.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2c/Barney-Fife.jpg

By: BenDover on 8/16/10 at 12:05

If you define 'too smart' as having arrogant contempt for the average man's ability to make decisions in the interest of himself and community then I'd agree with you loner. Those guys ARE 'too smart' for our own good.

By: brrrrk on 8/16/10 at 12:06

Another interesting statistic regarding our economy versus the Western European economy.

In spite of the fact that Western Europeans pay approximately 20% more in taxes, they also have a personal savings rate which makes ours look pitiful, even given that the American savings rate has gone up to 4.2% from below 0% in 2005. The average European savings rate is now at 15%.

By: Loner on 8/16/10 at 12:09

Good point, Captain Nemo. Thanks for posting that list.

Why can't Muslims honor their dead by building a mosque near the scene of their murder? The professional zealots who claim to represent the families of the 9-11 victims must have forgotten about those human beings and their grieving families.

Why insult the families of these victims by denying them permission to honor their dead in this way?

Seems like Ms. Burlingame, the 9-11 Victim's Honcho, ought to read and recognize those names too. I suspect that the woman is gaming the system, just a tad.